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James Oliver Horton Symposium on Abraham Lincoln
Celebrating the legacy of Abraham Lincoln

Save the Dates: May 25 & May 26, 2013

This event will be held twice, for audiences on either Hawai‘i or O‘ahu Islands
Click Here to Register Now!

Featured Presentations:
 

Paul Finkelman

Paul Finkelman

Vernon Burton

Vernon Burton

Ed Ayers

Ed Ayers

 
_ President William McKinley
Distinguished Professor

of Law and Public Policy and
Senior Fellow in the Government
Law Center,

- Albany Law School
Distinguished Professor of Humanities,
Professor of History and Computer Science,
- Clemson University
Director,
- Clemson Cyber Institute
President,
- University of Richmond
 
“How a Railroad Lawyer Became
The Great Emancipator”
“Lincoln, Emancipation, and Education” “Where Did Freedom Come From?”
___ Location A: Hilo, Hawai‘i Island   ___ Location B: Honolulu, O’ahu Island _
  Date: May 25, 2013
Venue: UH Hilo, UCB 100
Opening Remarks by:
__• Chancellor Donald Straney
__• Jeffrey Allen Smith
Times:
__• 1:30 – 4:30pm Presentations
__• 4:30 – 5:30pm Reception (UCB 127)
  ___ Date: May 26, 2013
Venue: UH Manoa, Art Auditorium
Opening Remarks by:
__• Robert “Bob” Buss
__• Maya Soetoro-Ng
Times:
__• 1:30 – 4:30pm Presentations
__• 4:30 – 5:30pm Reception
 
___ __ ___ ___
Sponsored By
Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation Hawaii Council for the Humanities UH Manoa College of Education Institute for Teacher Education UHH Student Activities Council UH Manoa College of Arts & Humanities UHH College of Arts and Sciences UH Hilo Conference Center
Dorrance Scholarship Programs' Charitable Fund

2013 James Oliver Horton Symposium on Abraham Lincoln with the support of The Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation, dedicated to perpetuating and expanding Lincoln’s vision for America and completing America’s unfinished work

This program is supported by a grant from the Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities

One thought on “Home

  1. Tomas Belsky

    Perhaps some thoughts on the attitude of the missionaries to Hawaii from the New England area and their thoughts about Slavery, the Abolitionists and what they may have felt about the future of Hawai’i during the ante bellum period and beyond.

    Reply

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